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obama's council of economic advisers. and mr. kief hennessey who teaches at the stanford university graduate school of business at stanford law school, and served as director of the national economic council under president george w. bush. keith hennessey served as both director of the national economic council and as assistant to president bush for economic policy. as director of the national economic council during the 2000 a financial crisis, mr. hennessy was at the center of one of the most volatile times in american history. he was a senior white house economic adviser when he coordinated the design of the president's policies on taxes, health care, pensions, energy, and financial markets and institutions, among others. mr. hennessy has spent more that 15 years in economic policy roles for senior elected officials. before his time in the white house who worked on capitol hill for more than seven years as economics advisers to former senate majority leader trent lott. since leaving the white house mr. hennessy has been a television commentator, one of the top 25 economic blogs b
leadership, the faith-based leadership, and, again, a shout out to president obama, his cabinet and the members on both sides of the aisle that stood by this region, the gulf coast, to rebuild after all of these years. and, mr. president, in conclusion, it's my only hope that after passing the sandy supplemental we will stand united with the northeast as they rebuild bigger, better, stronger, hosting the next super bowl, which is a real symbol of resurgence and rebuilding and resurrection. thank you, mr. president. and i yield the floor. mr. harkin: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from iowa. mr. harkin: mr. president, this week is a milestone for working families across america. 20 years ago this week, president bill clinton signed into law the family and medical leave act. you know, there are many laws that we pass here in washington that most americans never have reason to know or care about. the fmla, by contrast, has changed this country in profoundly important ways. it has touched the lives of millions of working families. it's almost hard to imagine today
everyone wants to know is how does our present president, president obama, what has he done? he has done a couple interesting ones. shovel ready is really his. hard to find that anywhere. the first t.a.r.p. we got shovel ready. snowmageddon is his. that was a totally spontaneous 2011 monster storm that came through, leaves the white house and gets, everything shutdown, he gets to the hilton hotel, this is snowmageddon. in 2011 he used the term sputnik moment. in his state of the union special saying this country needed a challenge, and outside moment that would generate our interest in research and development and education as had the sputnik launch in 1957. to a younger generation, sputnik is probably not as big a thing as it is to an older generation but that was pretty clever but most of his slogans, most of his abilities have not really caught on. another one he came up with, he was in washington and he said it is a strange construct but in august, this is the time when washington, things are hard to get done. nobody knows what that means but somehow is applicable. on that low note,
. according to president obama's former jobs council, by 2020 would be a million and have jobs without the college graduates to fill them. while there is a persistent unmet demand of four to 500,000 job openings and health care sector alone. recent reports indicate that there are not enough skilled applicants to fill the jobs in the booming natural gas industry. now, suppose colleges provided prospective students with reliable information on the unemployment rate and potential earnings white magic. what if parents have access to a clear and understandable breakdowns between academic studies and amenities? what with those costs be? armed with this knowledge, families and students could make better decisions about where to go to school, and how to budget their tuition dollars. students would actually have a better chance of graduating within four years and getting a job. helping students realize opportunity and a career, while keeping tuition costs low makes common sense. senators rubio and widen have a proposal that they unveiled right here at aei, which addresses this goal. i look forw
. [inaudible] [inaudible] >> the question as to the criticism of the obama administration on its actions in a variety of al qaeda firm somalia, yemen was persuasive. but what's the right answer? >> well, i don't have a right answer and there isn't a right answer for any of these various places, but i think we need to get jan in review of troops on the ground cumin no troops on the ground in the situation here. i do think it is in our interest to find a way to work with local partners in order to combat local groups and allow them to cover their territories with their own forces. unfortunately, the way to do that involves putting boots on the ground. we have a long tradition. it was started by a democratic president who is enthusiastic about this kind of thing as john f. kennedy and this is one of the things the special forces were created to do. it is a train and advise mission and its enabled mission. if we had been doing that in yemen, we would in a somewhat better place. the questions are what do you do where you don't have partners where they can succeed in what he thought the escala
with emerson's and which now the obama administration is trying to take a step further. the clinton administration privatized this in the processing, animals are slaughtered and another step where they are cut up and processed so in the reprocessing there has been the privatized system that we have done a lot of work showing how dangerous it is. the obama administration wants to increase this program especially for poultry. it would mean more than 200 birds a minute are being slaughtered in a plant. that is not a misstatement. 200 birds a minute. there is no way there can be any inspection of these carcasses and these are immigrant workers, extremely dangerous work. imagine both hands get sliced. all sorts of horrible injuries and because of all the contamination from salmonella you can never eat another piece of chicken. they get the chicken into chemicals, things like corn and sodium phosphate. that really over originated with the corn -- the clinton administration. a lengthy answer. i don't know how much time we have. >> what is the mandate of the usda? where did go wrong and wha
and what policy the obama administration and congress to propose to help stimulate the economy. this is just getting under way. >> a prime example of our ability to involve experts and debates on topics that are critical to the business community. i'm going to start us off today by queuing a video from christopher giancarlo of the gfi group, our sponsor, for this series. but for some want to make a brief announcement. this series, this economic series that we pose every quarter, has been accredited by the national association of state boards of accountancy to provide continuing professional education, credits for accounting professional. so we are quite excited of that and hopefully you will as well. this accreditation highlights the value of this and other programs that would hold her at the chamber. for more information on that please visit our website, or speak to some of folks outside in the registration desk. after the video i'm going to ask marty to come up directly and begin the program the first award from our sponsor, the gfi group. >> good morning. gfi group is deligh
's understanding and support for our efforts. in contrast, president obama believes that done carefully, deliberately and responsibly we can be more transparent and still insure our nation's security. finish so let me say it as simply as i can: yes, in full accordance with the law and in order to prevent terrorist attacks on the united states and to save american lives, the united states government conducts targeted strikes against specific al-qaeda terrorists, sometimes using remotely-piloted aircraft often refer today publicly as drones. and i'm here today because president obama has instructed us to be more open with the american people about these efforts. broadly speaking, the debate over strikes targeted at individual members of al-qaeda has centered on their legality, their ethics, the wisdom of using them and the standards by which they are approved. with the remainder of my time today, i would like to address each of these in turn. first, these targeted strikes are legal. attorney general holder, harold coe and jay johnson have all addressed this question at length. to briefly
of course more unless being passed 20 years later by the obama administration. the obama administration also believes that its experts know that what we need in terms of energy is green energy. so we're going to channel a lot of resources to green energy companies. but it's not just democrats that do this sort of thing. i was writing this morning about how the state of virginia has been trying to centrally plan the love lives of virginians for 100 years. they tried to keep the mentally feeble from reproducing the they tried to keep people of different races from marrying. now to try to keep people of the same sex from marrying. and in all these cases it really is, we experts know better than these people who should marry, who should love, how people should live. we've got a government that subsidizes marriage for some people and bands it for others. that is the fatal conceit. that is central planning. thinking that you can centrally plan love. so with individual rights. we're spontaneous order. and then the third key element is limited government, which is what protects individual rights and
they did, is that from frederick douglass to martin luther king to barack obama today, that magnificent progress that's going forward, we change, we are more accepting, we have a lot more blessing, we have a black man in the white house, but the acceptance and public culture of barack obama by the millions of white people who voted for him is still largely on their terms, not his. it's the people on the other side who are forced to accommodate across the lines, force always black folks have had -- it's not a choice and luxury to do with race. including barack obama who can't talk about race right now because if he does, the people who voted for him will find some reason to say that he is emphasizing too much. so race is still there. a place, it can pay enormous dividends in our future. to me, it is vital we get our sense of history more in line with what happened so we can restore our confidence and capacities of government to move forward. and i'm not saying it's going to be easy, but i think that it's beginning to have -- we have five years of anniversaries of things that are great bl
in 2004 and by the way have you changed any of your views since the election of barack obama? >> guest: i remember my mother when he was nominated, hazel and khalia and i were in montrÉal. she called me at the hotel. she was i think 93 then. she said, and she was crying. [inaudible] i didn't need that telling. i always knew this. america is many places. it is a place that can be tolerant and accepting, a place where views can be moderated and differences can be reconciled. and i think a good deal of america supported vigorously the candidacy of a rock obama. and it's not only important to the black community. it's important to other americans as well. but he still faces a sort of vicious kind of ridicule from certain borders that are not unlike the america we saw when i was young in richmond, virginia. but, i think there are several americans -- i had grown tired of at least one of them. >> host: and "quitting america" you wrote america never helps anyone, even the starving and list its proposed to an american interest either strategic or economic and one cannot always distinguish one fr
about the president obama and congressional leaders pressed their way about the public life at the fellowship foundation national prayer breakfast in washington. the annual event with president eisenhower. we also hear from johns hopkins director dr. benjamin. this is 90 minutes. [applause] ♪ ladies and gentlemen, the president of the united states and mrs. michelle obama. ♪ [applause] [applause] >> good morning. we've had a wonderful time together to discuss issues. thanks for your attention. it's overwhelming -- >> [inaudible] >> yes, have a seat. please, sorry. [laughter] >> thank you. >> it's overwhelming to think of the pathway that each person took to get to this event today. some from little villages halfway around the world, and some from just 12 blocks away. thank you. this event taken place for 61 years now began with a group of people that happened to be leaders wanting to get together for breakfast and prayer. one thing i know for sure is life is complicated and is likely to get more complicated. but as the senate of the weekly prayer group we've learned taki
. and this afternoon we are honored to host hillary rodham clinton. during her last 24 hours as president obama's first president obama's first secretary of state and immediately afterwards and told she might be expected to party like it's cartagena all over again. [laughter] we did a research and this is the eighth time that hillary clinton has spoken at the council and her third appearance in and her current incarnation as secretary of state. this afternoon speech is probably the most anticipated one she has given here and indeed it may be the most anticipated farewell address since 1796. [laughter] i suspect though that her views on untangling alliances might be somewhat different than george washington's. much has been made of the mile she has put in as the country's 67 secretary of state. you've seen the using the statistics. she has visited 112 countries and locked -- miles of flight time. more important than that madam secretary is what you have put into these miles and your 10 years coincide with what the most consequential events and decisions of this young century the balancing american for
. then president obama awards this year's recipients of the national medals for science, technology and innovation. and after that we're live as policymakers, health care industry leaders and representatives of government gather for a national health policy conference. >> congress returns today to capitol hill. the house comes in at 2 p.m. eastern to take up a small number of bills under suspension of the rules with votes at 6:30. also this week a debate and vote on a measure to require the president to submit a balanced budget to congress. over in the senate, members also come back at 2 eastern for general speeches. then at about 5:30, a vote on the bill to reauthorize the violence against women act, a domestic violence law that expired in 2011. a final vote on that could happen later this week. members of both parties are attending retreat this week. as a result, the senate will be out on tuesday and wednesday, and the house no legislative business on thursday or friday. live coverage of the house on c-span and the senate here on c-span2. >> host: and you're watching "the communicators" on c-spa
for an hour and will meet with president obama and the white house tomorrow her last day of secretary. her successors and it should john kerry opie at the state department monday for a welcoming ceremony. [applause] >> please take your seats. good afternoon and on behalf of bob rubin, carla hills who is with us today and the entire board of directors and the members i want to welcome you to the council on foreign relations. i'm richard haas president of the cfr. for those of you who don't know who we are we are an independent nonpartisan membership organization of think-tank and a publisher and we are dedicated to improving the understanding of the world of the foreign policy choices facing this country. today we are continuing what we have come to call secretary of state we cure the council. on tuesday night we were fortunate to hear from george shultz, who served as secretary of state for some six and a half years under president ronald reagan. and this afternoon we are honored to host hillary rodham clinton. during her last 24 hours as president obama's for secretary of state, immediate
primary care. [laughter] >> thank you. [applause] >> in a few moments, a discussion on how president obama may approach foreign policy and national security in his second term. and in a little less than an hour and a half, a cato institute forum on the state of libertarianism. >> several live events to tell you about today. the georgetown university law center hosts a forum with campaign staff members and representatives of interest groups who will focus on how lessons of last year's campaign will affect legislation in the new congress. that's on c-span at 11 a.m. eastern. and here on c-span2 at 1 p.m., we're covering an atlantic council discussion on the situation in mali. >> john mccain's 2000 campaign when he ran for president is the most memorable campaign. i mean, of any that i've ever covered or been around. i mean, it was just -- we'll never, we'll never see it again. i mean, here he was, you know, facing george w. bush who had all the face cards of the republican party backing him, and the three republican governors in new hampshire and all the money, and john mccain went out and h
of a back-and-forth towing the state of utah and the department of health and human services and the obama administration as to what does and does not comply with addict tapes of the affordable care act. it's not the only state in that quandary but utah having something on the ground in the field. shortly he will be talking about the utah exchange and place it in the larger context of what should represent an innovative state-led health policy reform and also talk a little bit about utah's approach to medicaid reform and a difficult process of getting the federal government to provide flexibility for the states in the state of utah's overall leadership role in promoting patient-centered health care. as some of you may recall last month and it's not a widely recorded story the obama administration asked the decided once again to change the product and change the name. so they decided in mid-january that they didn't want to call it health exchanges but they would now have what we call health marketplaces, marketplaces without our kit perhaps. the official explanation for this was that it was
and human services in the obama administration has stood desert is not comply with the dictates of the affordable care act. the listed in that quandary is something on the ground in short that governor herbert will be talking about the utah exchange, but also in the larger context of what should represent innovative and affect his policy reform and also about utah's approach to medicaid reform and the difficult process to get the federal government to provide flexibility to the states and city of utah's role in promoting market-based health care. something were caught last month in a not widely reported story, the obama administration decide if you can't the product, change the name, so they decided they don't want to be called health exchanges, but would not be called health marketplaces. perhaps they be called health marketplace is. the official explanation for this would save us because the word exchange could not be translated into his vanished language and for the month of hispanic beneficiaries under the exchange, they just wouldn't know what it meant to be a health exchan
of the united states, barack obama. [applause] >> thank you. thank you so much. thank you. thank you very much. please, have a seat. mark, thank you for the introduction. i thought he was going to talk about my gray hair. [laughter] than it is true that my daughters are gorgeous. that's because my wife is gorgeous. [applause] and my goal is to improve my gene pool. to mark and jeff, thank you for your wonderful work on behalf of this breakfast, to all of those who have worked so hard to put this together, to the heads of states, members of congress, and my cabinet, religious leaders, distinguished guests who are outstanding, speaker, who have journeyed to our capital. michelle and i are truly honored to be with you this morning. but before i begin, i hope people don't mind me taking a moment of personal privilege. i want to say a quick word about a close friend of mine and yours, joshua dubois your now, some of you may not know joshua, but josh was been at my side in work and prayer for years now. he is a young reverend, wising years. is worked on my staff dickies done an outstanding job as th
this accomplished than he is harming the republican party. >> senator mccain, have you talked to president obama about this issue? >> i have not. >> what are the state of relations these days? >> i, i have great respect for the president. i hope and i believe that at some point we will all be meeting with the president on this issue because we need to coordinate with the administration. but, i think, i haven't seen a degree of partisanship overall as there is today but we are showing some signs of bipartisanship. this thing we just did in averting the nuclear option in the senate, this issue, i think that republicans are more inclined to let the process go forward and senator reid is more, more inclined to let us have amendments. i see, i think that when we are down to 11% approval rating, there was a favorability thing, different things are favorable. a colonostomy is viewed more favorably than a member of congress. we're kind of in bad shape to say the least. i won't view that line any further. i got up in line, anybody said in the airport anybody say you look a lot like senator john mccain. i
of health and human services and the obama administration as to what does or does not comply with the dictates of the affordable care act. the only state in a quandary, utah a little far advance, something on the ground and in a few. in shortly governor herbert will be talking not only about the utah exchange but also places in the larger context of what should represent the innovative and effective state-led health policy reform. he will also talk a little bit about utah's approach to medicaid reform and the difficult process trying to get the federal government to buy more flexibility the states. the state utah's overall leadership in promoting market-based patient-centered health care. some of you may recall last month and not widely reported sure, the obama administration actually decided once again to if you can change the product you can change the name. so they decided in the mr. jindal there were no longer be called health exchanges but they would now forth with be called health marketplace. marketplaces -- the official explanation for the was there was because the wo
president obama weighed in urging the group to open its membership to everyone. he agrees. >> the boy scouts are unwilling to lift the ban they simply won't be relevant to a generation that decided to embrace lbgt brothers sisters, coworkers neighbors, friends. >> for now the ban remains in place. scout leaders say they need more time to consider and consult before deciding to whether to everyturn a century old policy. al-jazeera washington. >> that is an except from al-jazeera english, one. news programs that airs on that channel. bob wheelock, what is the lens or voice that your journalists approach their stories with? >> it is not any different from any other broadcaster i don't think. you look for the truth. you look to tell the story for the people and to give them a voice. we will go out and try to find central characters often, to drive a story, to try to give it, you know, something that you can invest in as a viewer. but, you know, essentially on a story like that it is a news story of the day. it is fairly cut and dried. we make a great effort getting all voices in. and then try to
a panel of scholars to preview president obama's upcoming state of the union address and how foreign policy and national security will be addressed in the president's second term. this is one hour and 20 minutes. >> good afternoon, folks. [inaudible conversations] >> good afternoon, folks. can i please get everybody to sit down and speak quietly? i think we are going to start here. good afternoon, everybody. i am danielle pletka. i am from the american enterprise institute. welcome to our first an annual series of state of the union policy event. every year, aei scholars come together and answer questions that have been raised or are likely to come up. we try to look forward a little bit and think about what the right answers are to the questions that are being posed. it is one of the few events that we do with only aei scholars, although i am very happy to be together with them. i will lay out for you what the other events are at the end of the session. but let the let me introduce the folks that are here with me at the table. first on the far left, so to speak, it is such a stock j
with you. we have inauguration this week. barack obama. january 19, 2013. this very month is full of epic anniversaries regarding race in american history. a separate 150 years ago says the emancipation proclamation. by lincoln which is now popularized in the story of the 13th amendment, just to january's later in 1865. nominated for the academy award for giving a sense of that history. more pertinent, 150 years, 2013, to get a sense of how tricky this history has been, i want you to think about the 50-year anniversary. fifty years ago this january, january 1963i was getting my driver's license. that was a big deal. martin luther king was not resolved to go into birmingham this month. he decided, and he did not tell his father, and he did not tell any of his board members because the new try to stop and. what he said was, after eight years since the decision the forces defending segregation had mobilized vociferously across a segregated states than the forces of freedom, and we are about to lose our window in history, and a final take more risk than i have the way the students have been t
it was fascinating. you know, it's like a president obama goes overseas for five days, everyone goes crazy. >> yes, when president obama goes, people pay attention and we have mass media. the back then, it was december 20, 1941. >> yes? >> is not really a question but a comment. i was reading about how much they were eating and he had access to certain things in the book with a rationing. so it redeem him. i'm so glad they put that there. i kind of wish it was earlier. >> thank you. well, it was an important chapter. it showed a part of churchill's character it was very important. a part of that many other people have in common with him. are there any other questions? >> churchill was known for being an excellent entertainer. did you find bills that he paid for everything? he was kind of that famous for not paying for food and various other things in his life though. >> i don't know about that, but most of the bills that i have seen, and i have seen many of them, aren't you that they are paid. all of the important it is that he had for his son's 21st birthday, they were paid for. that is an inter
are in the age of obama. but one great black man living in public housing with his family cannot turn its all right. he is a great man and a brother is going to be in public housing let it be 1600 pennsylvania ave. no doubt about that. [applause] i just want to see him come out one side with a housecoat on. with his cap, wassup! [laughter] but that's my fantasy. that's just my fantasy. wonderful, beautiful, brilliant people. the first lady, the president and their two wonderful children, but we want all families that are black and latino and asian and other indigenous people to be treated with equal respect and dignity. and we want all of our kids like sahsa and malia to be treated with recognition that is due to them sweet talk about these issues because they are extremely important. so i am going to introduce our speakers and the order in which they will appear first of all professor sharon davies is a very gifted scholar. she was the editor of the columbia law review while in her law school at columbia. you know about that and when barack obama became the first black editor at the harvard
i think they are conflicted like everybody else. the tech workers tend to be a little bit more obama than romney but it's a swing vote once you get away from the circle of issues. >> host: when it comes to your service in congress, did you push tech issues at all? >> guest: absolutely i push them. i did a lot of legislation that area. people were afraid to touch it because it was the tort liability and were afraid to make corrections because of something went wrong and they improve the product we could have liability. there was limited liability in place there and i was one of the co-sponsors for a bill we had on shareholder derivatives if we protected these companies from those lawsuits and innovative companies, we could get into some of the property issues, intellectual property issues and government procurement issues. government is not a very efficient procurement technology. i wrote the last cybersecurity law that goes to congress called fisma federal information security act and i was a chief author that so i was a prolific legislator in those areas. rochkind across party lines
light the world. and a generation later president obama's first inaugural noted that our ideals still light the world. we americans, we've described ourselves as a beacon of hope, a light in the darkness, our lamp lifted up in welcome and in example. daniel webster years ago said that our founders set the world an example. that was what the founding of america meant. our founders set the world an example. president clinton has pointed out that the power of our example -- the power of that example in the world has always been greater than any example of our power. that was the way bill clinton described it. and when daniel webster said that our founding fathers had set before the world an example, he went on to say this -- and i quote -- "the last hopes of mankind therefore rest with us. and if it should be proclaimed that our example had become an argument against the experiment, the knell of popular liberty would be sounded throughout the earth." i've spoken before about this small globe of ours, the light of dawn sweeping each morning across its face, lighting cities and cottages, b
long-term energy security, president obama needs to approve it. now, without further delay. mr. president, i would ask unanimous consent for just several minutes on another topic in regard to a recipient of the medal of honor from my state of north dakota. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. hoeven: mr. president, i rise today to honor one of our nation's true heroes, army staff sergeant clinton romashay. on monday, the president will present sergeant romashay with our country's highest military award, the medal of honor, for -- quote -- acts of gallantry above and beyond the call of duty, end of quote. clint comes from a long line of military heroes. his father is a veteran of the vietnam war. his grandfather fought in the u.s. army during world war ii. romashay often cites his grandfather as his greatest hero. it wasn't surprising that clint followed his example in joining the army in 1999. staff sergeant romashay showed courage every day that he donned his army uniform, but especially on october 3, 2009, one of the deadliest days of the war in afghanistan. on that
to tweet us, it's c-span wj. if you want to e-mail us, journal@c-span.org. what's the obama administration's approach to border security? >> guest: it's very interesting because now border security's becoming very complex. there's a strong border security component to the immigration reform bill that's being discuss ed and to the proposal that was put together by the so-called gang of eight senators who sat down in a bipartisan way and came up with a new proposal. their border security component is somewhat specific, and their whole immigration reform package hinges on securing that border. the obama administration proposal has more to do with interior enforcement, with changing laws of how we enforce verification of employment, the fact that people are here in the united states legally, all that kind of thing. and it's less specific on the border element of that. now, to me the whole hinge centers around what is a secure border. i mean, what is border security? and, in fact, there's no definition. it's subject to different interpretations, and what they're doing in the senate proposal whi
care at the time when state budgets are shrinking every place. >> it came out when the obama administration proposed change to the wage and hour and overtime regulation -- [inaudible] very concerned. >> absolutely. and it played out in california in exactly the same way. >> okay. i lay out a plan for expanding the state. organizing around this. barbara you're involved in that. tell us in your experience. what works and what hasn't worked in trying to organize grassroots movements in this area. >> the national dmoask workers alliance is growing. we started in 2011 as an organization and today we are -- [inaudible] organizations in 23 cities. and we are amplifying the efforts of domestic workers mostly immigrant population that is doing the work now. and our efforts around the country and around these workers. to influence their life and what we have -- [inaudible] we have a training program now for the domestic workers and the solidarity organized in leadership program, and to mobilize and to build leadership among domestic workers. i didn't talk about the new york domestic wo
. there is a whole food and pet spa menu are going to look at that neighborhood and say that is going to go for obama but instead it's a bunch of churches and playgrounds and a couple of kindergarten care centers you can be sure that town is granted for mitt romney. it turns out that is true. we are an enormous degree since 1970 the percentage is a landslide county which go overwhelmingly for one candidate versus the other for the presidential elections have increased. we are now about three-quarters of the country is a landslide county. it is one of the reasons that we look around and we think that we are more polarized and we've sort it out into these little communities. the point that the bishop was making and i ever reach we are not doing this on the base of the politics, people voting for the same candidates that we are but we are arguing on the basis of the lifestyle and to a large degree the lifestyle in america organized around with or not you were going to have children to read if you are not, you can live in brooklyn and have nothing but the pubs and bowling alleys and shops around you and
obama corley explains it needs to be comprehensive and lead to address the undocumented population and he might have seen president obama's speech about undocumented immigration and what he gets on that front. my sense is it is fundamentally politics and remember flights of the population that is foreign born, a decent number are part of the electorate and very engaged and this comes down to a matter of recognition and respect. there was a lot of bipartisan legislation being done at the start up visa and things like that and i think you are right. a piecemeal approach would be totally sane but from the perspective of the lobbyist it makes a lot of sense, let's try to attack this all at once part the because if you attach the attractive piece of legislation and consider the affordable care act, you saw a similar dynamic. if you saw just coverage expanding provisions in one lot it wouldn't look improving. you only have the revenue provisions of the affordable care act it looks like a massive tax greed. combine those with single piece of legislation it starts to look attractive. is th
is broken. now, according to president obama's former jobs council, by 2020 there will be a million and a half jobs without the college graduates to fill them. while there is persistent unmet demands of four to five hundred thousand job next the healthcare sector alone. recent reports indicate that there are not enough skilled applicants to fill the jobs in the booming natural gas industry. now, suppose college is provided prospective students with reliable information on the employment rate and potential earnings by major. what if parents had access to clear and understandable breakdowns between academic studies and amenities. what would those costs be? armed with this knowledge, families and students can make better decisions about where to go to school and budget their tuition dollars. students would actually have a better chance of graduating within four years and getting a job. helping students realize opportunity and a career while keeping tuition cost low makes common sense. now, senators rubio and widen have a proposal they unveiled which addressed this goal, and i look forw
. and later, president obama and congressional leaders speak at the fellowship foundation's prayer breakfast. testified about the attack thon u.s. consulate in benghazi, libarch that killed ambassador stevens and three other americans. the pentagon never received the request from the state academy for security, and did not have the resources to get support on the ground in time to thwart the attackers. leon panetta is stepping down. this hearing is four hours and 15 minutes. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> good morning, everybody. today the committee welcomes secretary of defense, leon panetta, and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, general martin dempsey. to testify about the department of defense's response the deadly terrorist attack on the u.s. temporary mission facility in benghazi, libya, last year. and the findings of its internal review following that attack, including lessons learned from benghazi. we will be receiving testimony next tuesday morning on the impact of sequestration and/or a full-year continuing resolution on the department of defense wit
, if barack obama had been caught doing some stuff he was doing, that he said in his own autobiography that he did, he wouldn't have been the president and the victim of implicit, explicit, subtext wall, above-ground, beneath ground, forms of bias. he is a study in all of it converging simultaneously. everything you want, everything. is right with him, right? [applause] too black. not black enough. right? too much swag, not enough courage. everything you want. every litmus test you can engage but the tragedy is, that, that the man who wrote one of the most brilliant books on race has been muzzled in the white house because of the fear of a dominant culture, of a black president or a president who happens to be black, and the knowledge that he could impart. it is like having michael jordan in the white house and can't talk about basketball. well that ain't what i'm supposed to do. i want to thank this panel for their brilliance and their insight and i want to thank you all for continuing to do a great job. [applause] >> coming up live today on the c-span networks, beginning here on c-span2 biel
obama nominated sonia sotomayor is a one -- as the 111th justice. i give you now just as sonia sotomayor. [cheers] [applause] >> thank you. [inaudible conversations] [cheers] [applause] >> hello. thank you. [applause] [applause] [cheers] >> when i got here in 2009, i met a whole bunch of texans for it because everywhere in this large state, i have been repeatedly invited and when you get a new job, you are a little busy. so i haven't been able to come here yet. but it is a tribute to the warmth of the people that i met that have been confirmed in a few hours but i have been here already. this is the third city on my tour. i was first in washington, my new home. i went back to the home of my heart, new york, over the weekend. as he saw on tv, i have been back and forth a lot between the two. [laughter] this is my worst trip outside. i am delighted that this is my first trip to texas. i'm delighted to be here. [applause] [cheers] [applause] i wanted to visit more than one city and i am going to austin. but i can't visit every place i want to. i still have a day job and only a few days to
and president obama are a good team, that is what matters. i don't worry about the policy positions. one way or another. he's not going to be a policy maker. president's policy is going go. but the fact that they feel that they can be a good team, to me that's an important thing. unless the.nominates somebody who is just, in my mind, unqualified or something. i tend to think leader should get who they want. we'll hold them responsible for the outcome. >> thank you, general mcchrystal. we have to stop now. [applause] >> we'd like to hear from you. tweet us your feedback twitter.com/booktv. here's a list of the ten best selling non-fiction e-book and print tiemghts according to the "new york times." it reflects sales aves january 31st. she appeared on booktv to discuss her book. and you can watch her discussion online at book of it -- booktv.org. lawrence wright debuts on the list third with the look to the world of church of scientology in going clear. scientology in hollywood. no. 4 bill they recount the assassination of john f kennedy. it's in the 16th week on the list. mark owens no easy d
you will look at the neighborhood and say that neighborhood is going to go for obama. if instead they instead they are churches and playgrounds and candor care centers you can be reasonably sure that town will vote for mitt romney. turns. turns out that is totally true. we have asserted ourselves to an enormous degree since 1970% edge of what are called landslide counties, the counties which overwhelmingly for one candidate verses the other in a presidential election has increase. -3/4 of the country is in a landslide county. for that reason we look around and think we are more polarized and we have sorted ourselves into these little communities. a point that bishop was made in that i agree with is we are not doing this on the basis of politics. but we are doing it on the basis of lifestyle and to a large degree the lifestyles of america are organized in round whether or not you will have children. if you are not going to have kids you can live in brooklyn and have nothing but pubs and bowling alleys and bookshops around you and life is great. i'm not looking my my nose down to w
show. more programming next week. >> just ahead, president obama speaks at a ceremony honoring recipients of this year's national medals for science, technology and innovation. after that we're live with a national health policy conference with industry leaders and representatives of government who will discuss what to expect in health care policy this year. and later more live coverage as former first lady laura bush speaks at the susan g. komen for the cure's global women's cancer summit. >> at age 65 she was the oldest first lady when her husband became president, but she never set foot in washington. her husband, benjamin harrison, died just one month after his inauguration. meet anna harrison and the ore women who served as first lady over 44 administrations in c-span's new original series, "first ladies: influence and image, their public and private lives and their influence on the president." produced with the white house historical associate, season one begins presidents' day, february 18th, at 9 p.m. eastern and pacific on c-span, c-span radio and c-span.org. [applause
of the u.s. administration and barack obama himself, they understand that they are focused in, to be effective in their relationships, they have to work well together. europe is a strong partnership. >> [inaudible question] >> i think it will require important adjustments and policies on both sides of the atlantic. it will eventually be done in the time span that you outlined. >> that would be one of the adjustments needed. >> i feel that there is a new sense of realism about europe within europe. the breakup of the euro, exit from the eurozone, all of these difficulties. all of the cynics who knew all of the answers had you never had any permanent data mechanism, you will never get to a point where you make it is and it is important. the european council is now moving on. when we didn't support the tax of [inaudible] , because their implications, yet the first meeting, it was the first item on the agenda. the countries that supported this could get out of. i think during this current time, we need to start the negotiations for free trade between the eu and the u.s. the greate
obama and his former jobs council, by 2012 -- excuse me, 2020, there is persistent demand of jobs in the health care sector alone. there are not enough applicants to fill the jobs in the booming natural gas industry. suppose colleges provided prospective students with reliable information on the potential earnings. what if parents had access to the clear and understandable breakdown to academic studies and amenities. students would have a better chance of graduating within four years and getting a job. helping students realize opportunity and a career while keeping tuition costs makes common sense the senators have a plan that addresses this goal. i am working with the chairman and pursuing legislative action in the house. in the courts of this congress, we would like to work to reform our student aid process to give students a financial aid option to finish studies sooner. including for-profit schools. and it will make the cost more transparent to parents and students in the millions of taxpayers who helped pay some of the bills. we owed to them. a good education leads to more in
democrats. it is coming. obviously clinton and obama late out at least their initial thoughts. none of the three laid out enough. i have written speeches how we should get out in the interest of time, i will go to your first question, general david petraeus. on the face of those selections by secretary gates they were ok, general david petraeus was a very impoverished general, very smart general, he knows that area. secretary gates and the president deserved the commanders that they want to. in my 12 years as senator i only loaded against one cabinet nominee and unless the cabinet nominee is so bad and so beyond the ability to resuscitator rehabilitate i always give the president the benefit of the doubt. the president deserves his team. general david petraeus is a good choice. got remember something about the army or the service. the foreign service like many of you, the war is not general david petraeus's war, it is the president's war and the military, all the people who work in the government follow the policy of the elected civilian government. they can give their opinions and
you context. the most important thing is if he and president obama are a good team, that's what matters. i don't much worry that policy positions because he's not going to be a policymaker. but the fact they feel they can be a good team to me is important. unless the president nominates somebody who's in my mind unqualified, i tend to think a leader should get who they want because we'll hold him responsible. >> thank you, general mcchrystal. we have to stop now. can't not [applause] >> next, set her effect on the otb in santa fe to discuss his book "blood and thunder: the epic story of kit carson and the conquest of the american west". >> kit carson is one of those guys almost better known for his fictional aspect. this is a guy that was the subject of hundred, alex and original pulp novels cold-blooded vendors and bad tv shows and bad movies. and so what we know about this guy is skewed and david by this cumulative history of fictionalizing. so when i decided to write a book about him, i wanted to peel back the layers of fiction and get to the real guy. it turned out the real
with the obama plan. they will say i'm an expert in this or they may even say they are affiliated in the program so what is not happening is they take people's money and then they skipped town. what we do is catch them, put handcuffs on them and put them in jail, make them stand trial and pay for their crimes and these people are being convicted and going to jail. this is unscrupulous to have a crime targeting people who are struggling during this financial crisis so sometimes we get calls related to those and we are trying to educate the homeowners about that so they don't become a victim in the first place but a lot of people lose their homes in this situation. >> host: inspector general for t.a.r.p.. we have a question about the teeth that you cannot this enforcement. ken 877-sig-2009 fired the pay czar? getting back to the executive pay of the treasury signs of, what can sigtarp do? >> guest: we make recommendations and those have to be dealt with. we also report to congress so we send these reports to congress and they helped to put it in their but we have a number of recommendations that a
however since i was appointed by president obama as the special and set -- inspector general for afghanistan reconstruction. since then i have traveled twice to afghanistan and spoken to the major players as well as many of our nation's top policymakers and prestigious think-tank experts including many right here at csis. i've i have learned a lot about our government's efforts there, what we have accomplished and what we haven't as well as the many challenges that still faces in that country. i have also spent a great deal of time thinking about what my role and what my agency's role at sigar is in afghanistan. let me tell you -- take a few minutes to tell you a little bit about sigar. it's not a well-known organization. it's not something that you smokey there. the special inspector general for afghan reconstruction is the only agency in the entire united states government whose mission is reconstruction in afghanistan. nothing else. so we are unique about that. we have the unique authority to examine any project by any government agency operating in afghanistan dealing wit
costs or less care at a time when state budgets are shrinking every place -- >> came out when the obama administration proposed changes to the wage and hour and overtime regulation -- >> right. >> and so the community was very concerned. >> yes, absolutely. and it's played out in california in exactly the same way. >> with okay. um, ai-jen laid out a very ambitious plan for expanding the state organizing around this. barbara, you're involved in that. tell us what in your experience, what works, maybe what hasn't worked in trying to organize a grassroots movement in this area. >> i must say, first, the national domestic workers eye -- workers' alliance is growing. we started in 2007 with 11 organizations, and today we have 40 affiliate organizations in 23 cities and 14 states. and we're amplifying the efforts of domestic workers mostly, they're mostly women, mostly immigrant population that's doing this work now, and we're amplifying our efforts around the country and around these workers to improve the lives, their lives. and what we have is, um, building their confidence. we have a tra
:00 p.m. eastern. president obama unveiling the plan for automatic spending cuts known as sequestration scheduled to begin on march 1st. on c-span2 remarkings from eric cantor on immigration and education issues. c-span3 nancy pelosi marks the 20th anniversary of the family and medical leave act signed in to law in 1993 by president clinton. >> you're watching c-span2 with politics and public affairs. on weeknights watch key public policy events and every weekend the non-fiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedule at our website. and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. at the recent world economic forum in switzerland participates discuss china's economic future and the policy changes needed to move the country forward. ists including -- analysts included economic professors from china and the u.s. the role world economic forum is anen yule event this is about an hour. [inaudible conversations] welcome from inside economic forum. the party congress has said the very ambition goal for all -- [inaudible] and. we'll ask whether ho
trade area? >> i think it is possible. to the members of the u.s. administration and barack obama himself, they understand that they are focused in, to be effective in their relationships, they have to work well together. europe is a strong partnership. >> [inaudible question] >> i think it will require important admentan require important adjustments and policies on both sides of the atlantic but i think it will eventually be done in the time span that you outlined. ou outli. >> that would be one of the adjustments needed. >> i feel that there is a new sense of realism about europe within europe. the breakup of the euro, exit from the eurozone, all of these difficulties. all of the cynics who knew all of the answers had you never had any permanent data mechanism, you will never get to a point where you make it is and it is important. the european council is now moving on. when we didn't support the tax of [inaudible] , because their implications, yet the first meeting, it was the first item on the agenda. the countries that supported this could get out of. i think during this cur
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